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Author Topic: Chkdsk error again !  (Read 2363 times)
musanna
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« on: March 16, 2003, 03:47:04 PM »

PLEASE SUPPLY RELEVANT INFORMATION:
Operating System Version:Windows XP Pro
Problem Application Name & Version:
Problem Hardware Make & Model:
Error Messages:Everything was going well for the next three re bootings. For the fourth it starts checking the disk for error. When checked chnkntfs e:,  it shows dirty again?! Done chkdsk e /r.Nothing was found wrong. Next three rebootings normal. 4th one again going to chkdsk mode. What is the solution?  
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bbhagrid
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« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2003, 01:53:13 PM »

I found some interesting info in the microsoft knowledge base might be worth checking into article Q322275 ..it states ...  

SYMPTOMS
If you use the fsutil command with the query parameter to check the status of the "dirty" bit on a FAT or FAT32 volume, Fsutil always indicates that the volume is not dirty.
CAUSE
This behavior occurs because Fsutil does not properly manage the dirty bit for FAT or FAT32 volumes. If you try to set the dirty bit on a FAT or FAT32 volume by using Fsutil, you receive a "The Fsutil utility requires a local NTFS volume" message.
STATUS
This behavior is by design.
MORE INFORMATION
The "dirty" bit is a bit in the boot sector (for FAT or FAT32 volumes), or in the MFT (for NTFS volumes), that is checked when Windows starts. This bit is checked to determine whether corruption has been detected in the file system. If the dirty bit is set on a volume, Autochk runs to correct any errors on the volume.

On NTFS volumes, the dirty bit is typically set only if the file system has detected potential corruption. In this case, an event is logged in the System event log.

You can use the fsutil command on NTFS volumes to query the current status of the dirty bit, or you can manually set the bit.

To query the current status of the dirty bit on a volume, use the following command:
fsutil dirty query drive:

hope this is of some help , I will keep looking for more help
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« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2003, 02:31:03 PM »

Chkdsk /X: A new command parameter that runs Chkdsk /F and forces a volume dismount to close open file handles on non-system volumes so it can be checked immediately. This eliminates the need of a potential reboot in order to perform the Chkdsk and repair the volume.

Chkntfs volume: Displays the file system type, the status of the file system dirty bit, and whether or not Chkdsk is manually scheduled to run against the volume at boot time.

Chkntfs /C: Schedules a volume to be checked at boot time (which it would do anyway if chkntfs /x had not been run against the volume previously). Chkdsk run only if the volume is found to be dirty.

Chkntfs /D: Restores the computer to default behavior and removes registry settings invoked by Chkdsk /F or Chkntfs /X. This means all drives are checked at boot time and Chkdsk is run against those found to be dirty.

Chkntfs /T:time: Changes the Autochk time-out value to the specified amount of time in seconds. If the time is not specified, displays the current settings. For additional information about this feature, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
191603 Modifying the Autochk.exe Time-out Value

For additional information about Chkntfs, please see the following article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
160963 CHKNTFS.EXE: What You Can Use It For

Autochk: Looks both at the dirty bit on each volume and for registry settings set by Chkdsk /F and Chkntfs /X or /C to determine if a volume will be checked or skipped.

NOTE: Chkdsk /F or Chkntfs /C to schedule a Chkdsk against a volume and Chkntfs /X to exclude a volume from being checked override each other. This gives the administrator complete control over whether or not Chkdsk is run against a given volume unconditionally, conditionally, or not at all during boot. The last command issued sets/resets the registry entries accordingly.

If you schedule a Chkdsk to run at boot time against a volume, and at boot time decide to bypass Autochk by pressing any key, Autochk does not run against that volume and removes the registry entry so Autochk is no longer scheduled to run against that volume in the future.

When Autochk runs against a volume at boot time it records its output to a file called Bootex.log in the root of the volume being checked. The Winlogon service then moves the contents of each Bootex.log file to the Application Event log. One event log message for each volume checked is recorded as follows:
Event ID: 1001
Source: Winlogon
Description: This includes file system type; drive letter or GUID, and volume name or serial number to help determine what volume Chkdsk ran against.
Also included is whether Chkdsk ran because a user scheduled it or because the dirty bit was set.

The registry entries used by Autochk to determine which volumes get checked at boot time are:
Hkey_local_machine\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\ BootExecute:REG_MULTI_SZ: autocheck autochk *

NOTE: This is the default setting for Autochk and also the result of using Chkntfs /d to have all volumes checked at boot time.

Additional entries that can be found in BootExecute are:

Registry value Function
/P \??\Volume: Schedules an unconditional Chkdsk against the volume.
/p \??\VOLUME{GUID} Schedules an unconditional Chkdsk against a volume mount point.
/k:Volume * Excludes Chkdsk from running against the volume.
/m \??\Volume: Tells Autochk to look only at the dirty bit on the volume, and if set, run Chkdsk.


Sample command Resulting registry entry
Chkdsk C: /F  Autocheck autochk /p \??\C:
Chkdsk C:\mountpoint /F Autocheck autochk /p \??\VOLUME{GUID}
Chkntfs D: E: /X  Autocheck autochk /k:D /k:E *
Chkntfs G: /C  Autocheck autochk /m \??\G:


Because Autochk can be controlled by setting or resetting registry settings, it is possible to programmatically schedule volumes for repair using Regini scripts.

just a little more info try searching the knowledge base for autochk and see if any of those help also have you thought of converting to ntfs? it is a bit better than the fat file system
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When I die, I want to die like my grandmother, who died peacefully
in her sleep.  Not screaming like all the passengers in her car.

Brian
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« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2003, 02:38:36 PM »

Hi,

Try running chkntfs /d

If problem persists, exclude using 'chkntfs /x e:'
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Sylvain Amyot
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