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Author Topic: Right click file ownership for XP, How to quickly own any folders and files.  (Read 3908 times)
Doctor Smith
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« on: June 14, 2009, 04:06:43 AM »

Takes ownership of files and folders with right click in XP.<<<<<<<

Download subinacl.exe from microsoft...

Code:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=E8BA3E56-D8FE-4A91-93CF-ED6985E3927B&displaylang=en

Quote
Overview
SubInACL is a command-line tool that enables administrators to obtain security information about files, registry keys, and services, and transfer this information from user to user, from local or global group to group, and from domain to domain. For example, if a user has moved from one domain (DomainA) to another (DomainB), the administrator can replace DomainA\User with DomainB\User in the security information for the user's files. This gives the user access to the same files from the new domain.

SubInACL enables administrators to do the following:

    * Display security information associated with files, registry keys, or services. This information includes owner, group, permission access control list (ACL), discretionary ACL (DACL), and system ACL (SACL).
    * Change the owner of an object.
    * Replace the security information for one identifier (account, group, well-known security identifier (SID)) with that of another identifier.
    * Migrate security information about objects. This is useful if you have reorganized a network's domains and need to migrate the security information for files from one domain to another.


This update addresses the following issues:

    * Fixed bug where subinacl.exe failed to process command line arguments
    * Fixed bug where subinacl.exe failed to function correctly with cluster file shares

...and copy to system32 and delete it from program files.
Make sure it is not in any other folder such as program files or won't work.

Copy code below to text and change extension from .txt to .reg and import.

Save it as eg takeown.reg and then click on it to install


Code:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\runas]
@="Take Ownership"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\runas\command]
@="CMD /C subinacl.EXE /file \"%1\" /owner=administrators && subinacl.EXE /file \"%1\" /grant=administrators=f"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\runas]
@="Take Ownership"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\runas\command]
@="CMD /C subinacl.EXE /file \"%1\" /owner=administrators && subinacl.EXE  /subdirectories \"%1\\*.*\" /owner=administrators && subinacl.EXE /file \"%1\" /grant=administrators=f && subinacl.EXE  /subdirectories \"%1\\*.*\" /grant=administrators=f"
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\runas]
@="Take Ownership"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Folder\shell\runas]
@="Take Ownership"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Folder\shell\runas\command]
@="CMD /C subinacl.EXE /file \"%1\" /owner=administrators && subinacl.EXE  /subdirectories \"%1\\*.*\" /owner=administrators && subinacl.EXE /file \"%1\" /grant=administrators=f && subinacl.EXE  /subdirectories \"%1\\*.*\" /grant=administrators=f"
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\runas]
@="Take Ownership"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\runas\command]
@="CMD /C subinacl.EXE /file \"%1\" /owner=administrators && subinacl.EXE /file \"%1\" /grant=administrators=f"
[/b]


Now you can right click on any file or folder, uncheck protect my computer, hit "OK" and it's yours.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2009, 04:54:30 AM by Doctor Smith » Logged




Doctor Smith
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« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2009, 04:24:48 AM »

How to take ownership of a file or a folder in Windows XP


    * INTRODUCTION
    * MORE INFORMATION
          o Prerequisites
                + Log on as an administrator
                + Start Windows XP Home Edition in safe mode
                + Disable Simple File Sharing in Windows XP Professional
          o To take ownership of a file or a folder
                + How to take ownership of a file
                + How to take ownership of a folder
    * NEXT STEPS
    * REFERENCES


INTRODUCTION
This article describes how to take ownership of a file or a folder to which you...
This article describes how to take ownership of a file or a folder to which you are denied access.

If you must access a file or a folder that you do not have rights to, you must take ownership of that file or folder. When you do this, you replace the security permissions that were originally created for the file or folder.


MORE INFORMATION
Prerequisites Log on as an administrator You must be logged on to Windows as an...

Prerequisites
Log on as an administrator
You must be logged on to Windows as an administrator in order to change security permissions for a file or a folder. If the computer is your personal computer, you are likely already logged on with an administrator account. If the computer is part of a network at work, you might have to ask the system administrator for help. To verify that you are logged on to Windows with a user account that is a computer administrator, visit the following Microsoft Web site:

Code:
http://support.microsoft.com/gp/admin (http://support.microsoft.com/gp/admin)

Start Windows XP Home Edition in safe mode

If you are running Windows XP Home Edition, you must start the computer in safe mode, and then log on with an account that has administrative rights in order to access the Security tab. Access to the Security tab is required in order to change security permission. If you are running Windows XP Professional, you do not have to start the computer in safe mode. For more information about how to start Windows XP in safe mode, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
304449  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/304449/ ) How to start the System Restore tool at a command prompt in Windows XP
Disable Simple File Sharing in Windows XP Professional

If you are using Windows XP Professional, you must disable Simple File Sharing. By default, Windows XP Professional uses Simple File Sharing when it is not joined to a domain. For additional information about how to do this, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
307874  (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307874/ ) How to disable simplified sharing and set permissions on a shared folder in Windows XP


To take ownership of a file or a folder
How to take ownership of a file
You must have ownership of a protected file in order to access it. If another user has restricted access and you are the computer administrator, you can access the file by taking ownership.

To take ownership of a file, follow these steps:

   1. Right-click the file that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
   2. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
   3. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
   4. In the Name list, click Administrator, or click the Administrators group, and then click OK.

      The administrator or the administrators group now owns the file.

To change the permissions on the file that you now own, follow these steps:

   1. Click Add.
   2. In the Enter the object names to select (examples) list, type the user or group account that you want to have access to the file. For example, type Administrator.
   3. Click OK.
   4. In the Group or user names list, click the account that you want, and then select the check boxes of the permissions that you want to assign that user.
   5. When you are finished assigning permissions, click OK.
   6. You can now access the file.

How to take ownership of a folder
You must have ownership of a protected folder in order to access it. If another user has restricted access and you are the computer administrator, you can access the folder by taking ownership.

To take ownership of a folder, follow these steps:

   1. Right-click the folder that you want to take ownership of, and then click Properties.
   2. Click the Security tab, and then click OK on the Security message (if one appears).
   3. Click Advanced, and then click the Owner tab.
   4. In the Name list, click your user name, or click Administrator if you are logged in as Administrator, or click the Administrators group. If you want to take ownership of the contents of the folder, select the Replace owner on subcontainers and objects check box.
   5. Click OK, and then click Yes when you receive the following message:
      You do not have permission to read the contents of directory folder name. Do you want to replace the directory permissions with permissions granting you Full Control?
      All permissions will be replaced if you click Yes.

      Note folder name is the name of the folder that you want to take ownership of.

   6. Click OK, and then reapply the permissions and security settings that you want for the folder and its contents.
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