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Author Topic: safe to change processor MHz?  (Read 2055 times)
SuperMonkey
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« on: November 29, 2004, 10:57:38 PM »

PLEASE SUPPLY RELEVANT INFORMATION:
Operating System Version:Windows XP SP2
Problem Application Name & Version:
Problem Hardware Make & Model:
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Hi, on my "Awardbios utility" i have the option of changing my processor mhz, currently it is set to 1905 mhz (or something around that area, i forgot the exact number) but i can set it to 2300 mhz, is it safe to do so? will it signficantly affect the heat in the computer? pros cons of doing so? thanks for the impurt in advance.

« Last Edit: December 09, 2004, 05:50:49 PM by Ageless » Logged

 
Ageless
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« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2004, 05:55:09 PM »

Sorry it took a while for someone to get to you, but no one ever looks in that forum. Wink

Yes, it can be unsafe to do it. Depending on what CPU you have now -by the looks of it, an AMD 2200?- you can burn out your CPU, blow up your motherboard or severely damage mobo/CPU/RAM. If you do want to overclock your CPU, start in small incremants. 2 to 5MHz at a time. Once your system starts going haywire (BSODs in Windows, tearing or smears on screen, anything out of the ordinary), clock it down immediately.

You may also want better cooling, especially on AMD CPUs as they run very hot by default.
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Jord.
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« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2004, 10:29:12 PM »

hey thanks for the reply, very informative.
I actually have the AMD Athlon XP 2600+, and I have the ASUS A7V8X-X MOBO.Right now I have 1 case fan and for my processor I have the CoolerMaster Jet 7, but I don't think there is any thermal paste between the heatsink and processor, does that make a big difference?

Also, from what you told me I am not going to attempt any OCing any time soon, I would if it was my own computer, but this is a family computer so i don't wanna piss them off by frying it lol.


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« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2004, 04:41:58 PM »

The termal paste between the CPU and the heatsink makes for a better contact and heat disposal of the CPU. If applied correctly (thin and only on the CPU itself, not the whole upper side of the cartridge it lives in), it will fill in any micro holes that will otherwise prevent cooling. Air transfers heat worse than the termal paste will do.

Take a look around on www.overclockers.com for a better description of it all. Smiley
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Jord.
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« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2005, 11:16:55 AM »

The faster you have your CPU, the more voltage you will need to keep it stable, as the signal quality will be degraded.

The more voltage you use, the hotter it will get, and you may need additional cooling if you're planning on running it permanently at this speed.

As Jee said, thermal paste is a good idea in order to get heat transfer as efficient as possible between the CPU die and however you intend to cool it. If you can get away with it, it is best, of course, not to use thermal paste. But as the CPU die and the heatsink is rarely flat, thermal paste is used to fill in the gaps.

The theory is that it is more conductive than air that would normally fill in these gaps, but too much of it will result in a hotter CPU as it is far less conductive than metal-to-metal.

I strongly recommend you to read a lot about overclocking before you try it for yourself. I learned to overclock on an old Pentium-200 machine, and reading around www.overclockers.com.
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